MARKS OF TIME by Gloria e Rudi Fenaroli
"Ancient Future" Introdution by Lecturer Guido Cecere

19th Century photography faced difficulties from the very beginning of its formation, as it struggled to earn respect and credibility in comparison to the more 'traditional' forms of visual art (drawing, painting, carving). These difficulties were due to a natural mistrust of new technology that had materialized on the art scene. The new technology that created photography's mechanical nature made it suspicious in the eyes of those who linked the concept of "art" to more traditional "handmade" art which was without help from automatic machines. This was the birth of the "pictorialism" movement. This international movement (that) was followed by famous and unknown artists alike. They aimed to achieve the precision and the realism that photography was capable of whilst at the same time trying to create atmospheres and effects similar to those created in the classical arts.

Thanks to the birth of the "pictorialism" movement, the art of photography began to be considered as traditional arts. This shift allowed photography to gain access to exhibitions and salons bringing it out into the open market. The followers of "Purism" were openly against the emergence of the "pictorialism" movement. It was perceived as a betrayal of the natural means of art production. In their opinion, the modernism of photography did not adhere to the established stylistic elements of Art. Though this dualism in photography has never fully dissolved, "pictoralism" has been established as a credible form of art expression. The debate has been exacerbated, however, by the emergence of digitally modify pictures. The debate between pure, traditional photography and digital photography is now on. It is not necessary, however, to continue this controversy. There is no need to rank or grade different means of understanding and practicing art photography. Any and all forms of art production must be appreciated in their own right. In principle, the importance of art is the end result, not the methods of production. The ability to distinguish a masterpiece from mediocrity; a piece of art that catches a viewer's eye or stimulates a viewer's inner self, is the ultimate concept of art. In this light, the method and technology used in the creation is of no importance.

These portraits by Gloria and Rudi Fenaroli have this ability to distinguish themselves from mediocrity. The gallery offers an extraordinary examples of the aging process of men, from infanthood to old age prompting the viewer to mediate on life and the passing of time. It is with time that photography has established an unbreakable link. Even in the last few years, this link has become even faster and efficient, almost inhuman (who can perceive a millionth of a second?) As a challenge to technology's attempt to reach an ever faster speed, Fenaroli decide to go back to an original lingering look that finds the taste and feeling of old time atmospheres. This expresses the wish of the artist's imaginative eye and yet avoids being overwhelmingly nostalgic. The sentiment of Fenaroli's work entices the viewer's eye beyond the contemplation of a face or a body, instead asking the viewer to travel deep under the surface.

This is why the glossy and cold surface of the photograph can become a door which opens up access to another new dimension of the image; the temporal dimension. The manual modification used in these prints initially conveys more intensity to the look as well as the feel. The elegance of this production is something that does not happen often in today's form of digital media where people seem to be more interested in superficially impressive, glamorous digital effects. It is the joy of all the models and collectors that each piece in this gallery becomes unique and unre peatable. These pieces are destined to acquire more value with time as media and art become more and more digitalized. This collection is a testament to the artist's extraordinary ability to combine contemporary techniques with precious hand work as they tune into the frequencies of an antique future.

 
Italian - ItalyEnglish (United Kingdom)

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